Added to Cart
1
Keep Shopping
Go to Cart
Close
Guest
price
Member
price
Add to Cart
You have 2 in Your Cart Checkout Now
Description
Our GlobeIn Premium Wrap
Hand wrapped with love, each gift comes with its own regional pattern, giving your gifts an international flair.
Premium gift wrap ‚Äď $5
I got it

‚úď Item added to cart
View Cart

Gift Wrap Eligible
Hand Woven Cotton Tortilla Warmer Pouch - Oaxacan Warmer in Fuchsia
Oaxacan Warmer in Fuchsia
Hand Woven Cotton Tortilla Warmer Pouch - Oaxacan Warmer in Fuchsia
Hand Woven Cotton Tortilla Warmer Pouch - Oaxacan Warmer in Fuchsia
Hand Woven Cotton Tortilla Warmer Pouch - Oaxacan Warmer in Fuchsia
Hand Woven Cotton Tortilla Warmer Pouch - Oaxacan Warmer in Fuchsia
Oaxacan Warmer in Fuchsia
Hand Woven Cotton Tortilla Warmer Pouch - Oaxacan Warmer in Fuchsia
Hand Woven Cotton Tortilla Warmer Pouch - Oaxacan Warmer in Fuchsia
Hand Woven Cotton Tortilla Warmer Pouch - Oaxacan Warmer in Fuchsia

Hand Woven Cotton Tortilla Warmer Pouch - Oaxacan Warmer in Fuchsia

$30.00Guest price
$24.00Member price
Available Premium Gift Wrap
You can optionally add Premium Gift Wrap into cart.
Learn more >
Overview
Sustainably
Sourced
Handmade
Satisfaction
Guarantee
Description

First created in what is today known as Mexico, the tortilla plays an essential role in Central and North American cuisine while becoming more widespread around the globe. Specializing in cotton kitchen linens, Zapotec descendant Olga Jimenez weaves this pink cotton tortilla holder on the backstrap loom in a process that dates to the 16th century. Commonly used for preserving fresh tortillas while allowing them to vent or for heating in the microwave, tortilla holders go hand-in-hand with the Western Hemisphere's favorite flatbread.

  • 100% cotton
  • 1.28 oz
  • 0.2 inches H x 9.8 inches Diam.

THE STORY BEHIND THE PRODUCT

Artisan Organization: Olga Jimenez

Country: Mexico

"I was born in Teotitlan del Valle, a weaving town in Oaxaca. It is the land of sheep's wool and colorful handloomed textiles.

"You might say I have weaving in my blood. When I was 12, my parents began teaching me to weave. And so I learned the history and the essence of this beautiful tradition.

I work together with my husband, Mario Chavez, who is also a weaver. In the case of women, we learn at a very young age. It's a tradition that goes back to the 1500s.

"We had the natural pigments and knowledge of them. The Spaniards introduced the treadle loom. And it became a custom that women weave.

"What do I like best about my work? Why do I continue weaving day by day? I want to preserve this tradition that has made me the woman I am today.

"I want to teach my children this beautiful legacy, and this is my inspiration. I want them to observe the details of our craft, and discover the peace and satisfaction it brings.

"It's wonderful to be able to show my work to the world. For me, this art is part of my identity, and I want to encourage my community. Thank you for helping me preserve our Zapotec culture and its magic. I hope to continue this work.""

Top Rated